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Posts Tagged ‘perennial’

In my head, I said this post’s title much like Dr. Frankenstein when his experiment woke up.

While it may seem a bit silly, it kind of replicates my feelings when I saw our herbs bouncing back. The oregano has sprouted a handful of leaves, and the chives and mint are getting out of control, which is a bit of a surprise because it’s still so early in the season.

Chives and oregano in the first pot, mint behind it.

Chives and oregano in the first pot, mint behind it. The thyme didn’t survive the transplant.

Last year we dedicated an entire raised bed to herbs. Matt thought that was a waste of space, and I’ve come to see his point. Our plan this year is to intersperse the herbs throughout the vegetable beds – both as a space saver and possible pest deterrent.

But until we planted tomatoes, squash, peppers and a host of other plants, herbs were going to be on hold. So when I dug up the landscape fabric from last year’s herb bed, I replanted the chives, thyme and oregano in a spare pot until they were needed.

My thought was if they survive, great; if not, no big deal.

We’re glad to see they’re mostly doing well – the thyme looks dead, but the other two transplants look lush. I’m going to divide the chives into smaller clumps and plant them around the maple tree in our back yard. We also have hostas there that were nearly destroyed by slugs, and chives are supposed to repel those slimy beasts. Plus, they have pretty purple flowers when you let them go to seed.

As for the mint, well, Derby Day is right around the corner …

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Signs of spring?

It’s been really warm here for the past several days–we’re talking 60 degrees or more in January. Ohio weather is notoriously bipolar, so I’m not surprised it was warm on Jan. 11 and is supposed to be in the mid-30s on Jan. 14.

The weather inspired me to check out our garden, which I haven’t really paid any attention to since the final leaves were raked away this fall. I was happy to see that the shredded leaves were decomposing nicely–the big, two-foot tall pile is now a smattering about three inches thick. That should provide a good nutrient boost in the spring.

That's parsley poking through the leaves. The greenery in the second bed is peas I've left to compost directly in the bed.

That’s parsley poking through the leaves. The greenery in the second bed is peas I’ve left to compost directly in the bed.

I also noticed our parsley, which was chewed down to the stems by butterfly caterpillars, is poking through the leaf debris. I knew chives, thyme and oregano were perennials but didn’t think parsley was. After a bit of research, I found out parsley is not really a perennial, it’s a biennial. That means the leaves are only good the first year, and it sets seeds in its second year.

We’ll plan on planting some more next spring, but I might let the seeds lay where they fall and see what pops up the following years.

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