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Posts Tagged ‘composting’

Last weekend we did some basic garden clean up — removing the leftover leaves, turning the soil and moving some of the perennial herbs like chives, oregano and thyme.

The herbs are in temporary pots until I decide where to put them, either back in the beds or in other containers. Also, the garlic is doing very well! I can’t wait to harvest our own, and our limited success so far this year means we’ll definitely be trying it again next year.

Also, I’m happy to report the in-bed composting worked fantastically! We weren’t sure if it would, but except for a stray peanut shell or flower stem, everything broke down during winter. This is also something we’ll continue each year. It’s a great way to add more nutrients directly to the soil.

Finally, our planting schedule is getting thrown off a bit again because of the weather. We’re officially in spring, but there is supposed to be another round of snow this week with lows below freezing for most days.

To me, it’s not worth it to buy the broccoli transplants or seed lettuce/spinach/peas when they could just die in the cold.

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I wrote this in November and forgot to post it. But instead of re-writing it, I’ve decided to put it on the blog anyway. We haven’t been keeping up with the in-bed composting as often as we planned, mostly because we haven’t been collecting kitchen scraps and our stash of leaves is soaked from the snow. 

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A couple weeks ago we did some major fall clean up in the garden. It’s always sad to rip everything out, but what wasn’t diseased was cut up and tossed into the compost bin.

We were able to save some of the herbs and preserve them for the winter (more on that later). As I mentioned in other posts, we have lots of beautiful trees on our street. In past years, we’ve shredded them and added the leaves to our garden beds to decompose over the winter. But I recently learned many of the pests that plague our garden – most notably the cucumber beetle – overwinter in leaf debris, so we’re switching it up.

I know it will be impossible to keep all the leaves out of the garden, but I don’t want big piles on each bed, so we’re trying in-bed composting. The basic concept is digging a big hole and adding your green material (plant debris, vegetable scraps, etc.) and brown material (dried leaves, shredded paper, etc.) and burying it. The idea is it will breakdown over the winter and add nutrients directly to the beds.

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